NovaCentrix Scales Production of Metal Nanopowers to Accommodate Commercial Application Needs

May 25, 2007

U.S. nanotechnology products company NovaCentrix has announced that it has developed and implemented commercial-scale production equipment that can annually produce metric tons of nanoscale metal materials including silver, copper, and aluminum to “meet current and future commercial application demands” in printable electronics, life science, and energetics. NovaCentrix’s vice president of engineering Drew Granzow said, “The demand for low cost, high volume printed electronics, anti-microbial and anti-viral materials, and nano-enhanced explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics requires scaling without compromising quality or excellence.” The new production process borrows scaling methods from the high volume semiconductor and computer manufacturing industries.

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NovaCentrix Scales Production of Metal Nanopowers to Accommodate Commercial Application Needs

May 25, 2007

U.S. nanotechnology products company NovaCentrix has announced that it has developed and implemented commercial-scale production equipment that can annually produce metric tons of nanoscale metal materials including silver, copper, and aluminum to “meet current and future commercial application demands” in printable electronics, life science, and energetics. NovaCentrix’s vice president of engineering Drew Granzow said, “The demand for low cost, high volume printed electronics, anti-microbial and anti-viral materials, and nano-enhanced explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics requires scaling without compromising quality or excellence.” The new production process borrows scaling methods from the high volume semiconductor and computer manufacturing industries.

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Link to NovaCentrix 


Titania and Alumina Nanofiltration Membranes for Removing Viruses from Air, Water, and Blood

May 25, 2007

Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia report that they have developed ceramic nanofiltration membranes that can potentially remove viruses from water, air, and blood. The researchers say that they have successfully used the ceramic membranes in preliminary trials to remove viruses from water. According to researcher Huaiyong Zhu, existing ceramic membranes often crack during fabrication and do not concurrently provide high filtration flow and effective filtration of viruses. The new membranes are constructed with nanoscale ceramic fibers and reportedly provide ten times faster flow rates than existing ceramic membranes. Zhu said that the technology could potentially be used to filter waterborne contaminants, airborne viruses such as SARS and the avian flu, and bloodborne viruses such as HIV. Zhu also said: “”It’s literally home-grown technology. Titania is a compound found in beach sand and alumina is an intermediate product of aluminium which is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust. Australia is the largest producer of alumina and titania in the world meaning we can make [the ceramic membranes] relatively easily and cheaply.”

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Nanoscale Aluminum and Gold Research Yields Method for Producing “Memory Metals”

May 25, 2007

Researchers from the University of Illinois in the U.S. studying nanoscale aluminum and gold films have developed a method for creating “memory metals” that, when bent, can revert to their original shapes with the application of heat. Researcher Taher A. Saif said: “We found that the type of metal doesn’t matter. What matters is the size of the grains in the metal’s crystalline microstructure, and a distribution in the size.” The researchers say that if a metal’s grains are too small, it will be brittle and break, but if its grains are too big, it will be malleable and remain in the position in which it is bent. The memory metals, however, combine small and large grains: the large grains bend, placing pressure on the small grains which, over time, will force those large grains back to their original shape. The researchers say that the application of heat can help speed up this process by expediting the small grains’ release of elastic energy. The researchers say that controlling the crystalline microstructure of thin films can help reduce the amount of energy lost in electronic circuit parts used in a variety of products.

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Low-Cost Carbon Nanotube Production Method Based on Aluminum Nitrate

May 25, 2007

Researchers from the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus and their counterparts from India have developed a new technology for lower cost production of carbon nanotubes. The researchers have used the technology in a pilot plant with the capacity to produce 10 grams of carbon nanotubes per hour. The researchers from the two countries are also involved in a joint research project on the production of heat-conducive substrates based on aluminum nitrate exported from India to Belarus. The state committee for science and technology of Belarus has reported that the new technology also reduces the main cost of these substrates by 10 to 12 percent, does not produce hazardous waste, and is environmentally-friendly. According to the state committee, Belarus and India have been involved in seven joint research projects between 2005 and 2007 to develop new technologies, materials, and equipment and have plans to continue bi-lateral science and technology cooperation.

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